Current Research Projects

In the last three years I have led 18 nights of W. M. Keck Observatory observations, which have resulted in the largest sample of spectroscopically-confirmed ultramassive galaxies (UMGs) in the early Universe. This Massive Ancient Galaxies at z>3 NEar-infrared (MAGAZ3NE) survey is still ongoing but has already shown that these monster galaxies form stars surprisingly fast and "die" surprisingly quickly.

I lead the Spitzer Adaptation of the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey (SpARCS), which has detected hundreds of clusters at z > 1 in the Spitzer SWIRE Legacy Survey Fields. Because clusters are rare, wide-area surveys are important to detect a representative sample. SpARCS' innovation was to utilize Spitzer Space Telescope infrared observations which, in combination with ground-based optical imaging, allowed clusters to be detected to higher redshift than traditional techniques. The SpARCS team is in the process of studying the properties of many of these distant clusters in detail, using facilities such as Keck, Gemini, ALMA and the Hubble Space Telescope. SpARCS has also generated three large spin-off surveys - "GCLASS", "GOGREEN", and "See Change" (see below for more details).

My graduate student Mohamed Abdullah and I have been working together with Professor Anatoly Klypin on a project to constrain cosmological parameters using observations from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We have developed a new technique, Galweight, to determine cluster membership and used it to create GalWCat19, a new catalog of 1800 SDSS clusters, which we have made publicly available. By comparing the number of clusters in our new catalog with simulations, we have been able to determine that matter makes up about 31% of the total amount of matter and energy in the Universe, with the remainder consisting of dark energy. Our results have received quite a bit of press attention, and our measurement was selected as one of the ten biggest science stories to come out of the University of California in 2020.

I am also involved with "Local Volume Complete Cluster Survey" (LoVoCCS), "Spitzer Survey of Deep Drilling Fields" (DeepDrill) , and "Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey" (SERVS).

  • I led the Gemini Cluster Astrophysics Spectroscopic Survey (GCLASS), a 25 night multi-year follow-up program of 10 SpARCS clusters using the Gemini Observatory.
  • The "Gemini Observations of Galaxies in Rich Early ENvironments" (GOGREEN) survey was a 50-night multi-year follow-up program of clusters and groups at 1 < z < 1.5 (nine of the 12 clusters were from SpARCS). Completed in 2019. GOGREEN is the largest of Gemini Observatory's "Large & Long" Programs. All of the data (spectroscopy, imaging and catalogs) from both the GOGREEN and GCLASS surveys have been publicly released.
  • "See Change" is a 174-orbit Hubble Space Telescope "Multi-Cycle Treasury" program to constrain dark energy by studying Type Ia supernovae in clusters, including those from the SpARCS survey.
  • Prospective Students

    I welcome new Graduate Students. If you are already in the UCR Physics & Astronomy Graduate Program and considering studying for a Master's or Ph.D. degree under my supervision, please contact me. If not yet in our department's graduate program you can apply here.

    UCR Research Group

    I welcome Graduate Students. If you are already part of the UCR Physics & Astronomy Graduate Program and considering studying for a Master's or Ph.D. degree under my supervision, please contact me. If not yet accepted to our department's graduate program you can apply here.

    Postdoctoral Researchers

  • Ben Forrest (2018-present)
  • Jeffrey Chan (2017-present)
  • Alessandro Rettura (2009-2012), currently Systems Engineer at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena
  • Ricardo Demarco (2008-2009), currently associate professor at The University of Concepcion, Chile

  • Graduate Students

  • Wenjun Chang (2021-present)
  • Ian McConachie (2016-present)
  • Mohamed Elhashash (graduated 2020)
  • Ryan Foltz (graduated 2017)
  • Andrew DeGroot (graduated 2016)
  • Alireza Farahmandi (graduated 2013)

  • Masters Students

  • Ethan Batson (graduated 2016)
  • Joseph Cox (graduated 2014)

  • Undergraduate Students

  • Jesus Martinez (summer 2021), UCB UC LEADS Fellow
  • Adam Lane (2014-2016)
  • Erick Espinoza (2014-2015)
  • Amalia Callahan (summer 2014)
  • Samantha Rorick (winter 2011); 2011-2012 NASA & the Hispanic College Fund ''Motivating Undergraduates in Science and Techmology'' (MUST) Scholar
  • Sarah Logsdon (summer 2010); 2010 UCSD Physical Sciences Dean's Award for Excellence, PhD Astronomy UCLA, currently Assistant Scientist/NEID Instrument Scientist at NSF's National Optical-Infrared Astronomy Research Laboratory (NOIRLab)
  • Alex Garabedian (2008 - 2009); 2008 Participant in CUREA undergraduate Astronomy experience program at Mt. Wilson Observatory, PhD Physics Brown, currently Associate at End-to-End Analytics
  • Wojciech Karas (2008 - 2009); 2008 Undergraduate Winner of UCR Department of Physics & Astronomy Michael Devirian Prize, Winner of Robert Wild Prize for Outstanding Undergraduate in 2009, Master's Computer Science UCR, currently Software Engineer at Glidewell Dental
  • Daniel Seisun (2008 - 2009); currently Engineering Manager at Stripe
  • Astronomy Press Releases

    "Scientists Precisely Measure Total Amount of Matter in the Universe". UCR Press Release about our measurement of the total amount of matter in the Universe. We created a new cluster catalog from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) observations using the new galaxy orbit technique we developed (GalWeight). By comparing the number of clusters in our new catalog with simulations, we were able to determine that matter makes up about 31% of the total amount of matter and energy in the Universe, with the remainder consisting of dark energy. Our measurement is one of the most precise measurements ever made using the galaxy cluster technique, and is the first use of the galaxy orbit technique to obtain a value in agreement with those obtained by non-cluster techniques (cosmic microwave background anisotropies, baryon acoustic oscillations, Type Ia supernovae, or gravitational lensing). By combining our measurement with measurements obtained from non-cluster techniques, we were able to determine a best combined value and conclude that matter makes up 31.5+/-1.3% of the total amount of matter and energy in the Universe. The paper was led by my graduate student, Mohamed Abdullah, and the story was picked up by many major media outlets, 2020

    Our measurement of the total amount of matter in the Universe was selected as one of the ten biggest non-COVID University of California science stories of 2020

    Interview with Agence-France Presse (world's oldest and third-largest news agency) about our measurement of the total amount of matter in the Universe, 2020

    "Astronomers Discover Unusual Monster Galaxy in the Very Early Universe", UCR Press Release about "XMM-2599", an ultramassive galaxy which formed most of its stars in a huge frenzy when the universe was less than 1 billion years old, and then quenched (stopped forming stars) by the time the universe was only 1.8 billion years old. While rare, galaxies as massive as XMM-2599 are predicted to exist by current-generation simulations but none are predicted to be so quenched at this early epoch, posing a challenge to our current understanding of how massive galaxies form and quench in the early Universe. The paper was led by my postdoc, Ben Forrest, and the story was picked up by many major media outlets (CNN, USA Today, Science Daily, CNET, Forbes) and resulted in interviews with the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC), Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC), and Sky & Telescope, 2020

    "Astronomers Discover Unusual Monster Galaxy in the Very Early Universe", W. M. Keck Observatory Press Release about XMM-2599, 2020

    "Ancient Giant Galaxy Grew Fast and Died Young", Scientific American Article about XMM-2599, 2020

    Two Live Radio Interviews about XMM-2599, BBC, Newsday, 2020

    Podcast about XMM-2599, The Cosmic Companion, 2020

    "The Vibrating Universe: Making Astronomy Accessible to the Deaf", UCR Press Release describing an astronomy workshop we developed for students with hearing loss at the California School for the Deaf, Riverside, 2019

    "New Insight into Why Galaxies Stop Forming Stars", W. M. Keck Observatory Press Release describing the best measurement ever made of the quenching timescale. By comparing observations of distant SpARCS clusters to nearby clusters, we were able to measure how the quenching timescale varies across 70 percent of the history of the Universe. The paper was led by my graduate student, Ryan Foltz, and concluded that a dynamical process such as gas stripping is more likely to be responsible for the quenching than strangulation or outflows, 2018

    "UCR astronomers get Best Measure Yet of How Fast Star Formation Stopped in Galaxy Clusters in the Early Universe", UCR Press Release describing the SpARCS quenching timescale measurement and our conclusions, 2018

    "Study provides new insight into why galaxies stop forming stars", UCR Astronomy Press Release describing observations and conclusions about the quenching timescale from the SpARCS survey, 2018

    "UCR-led Team Develops New Cosmological Tool for Weighing Galaxy Clusters", UCR Astronomy Press Release describing a new cosmological tool, GalWeight, we developed which uses galaxy orbits to "weigh" clusters. In the paper which was led by my graduate student, Mohamed Abdullah, we showed that our new technique is 98% accurate in correctly assigning cluster membership and that its performance compares very favorably to the four most widely used existing techniques, 2018

    "Scientists get Best Measure of Star-forming Material in Galaxy Clusters in Early Universe", W. M. Keck Observatory Press Release describing how the SpARCS team were able to make the most precise measurement to date of the amount of fuel available to form stars in galaxy clusters in the early Universe. Surprisingly, we discovered that, compared to field galaxies, cluster galaxies have higher amounts of molecular gas relative to stars. It has long been known that when a galaxy falls into a cluster, interactions with other cluster galaxies and hot gas accelerate the shut off of its star formation relative to that of a similar field galaxy (via the process known as environmental quenching). If cluster galaxies have more fuel available to them one might expect them to be forming more stars than field galaxies and yet, intriguingly, they are not, 2017

    "Scientists get Best Measure of Star-forming Material in Galaxy Clusters in Early Universe", UCR Astronomy Press Release describing the SpARCS team's measurement of the amount of fuel available to form stars in galaxy clusters in the early Universe, 2017

    "How a UCR team finds Galaxies Far, Far Away", Riverside Press-Enterprise newspaper article describing the SpARCS survey and findings from the survey's newly-discovered high-redshift sample, 2016

    "How a UCR team finds Galaxies Far, Far Away", Riverside Weekly newspaper article describing the SpARCS survey and findings from the survey's newly-discovered high-redshift sample, 2016

    "Cosmic Neighbors Inhibit Star Formation, Even in the Early Universe". W. M. Keck Observatory Press Release describing the discovery of four new SpARCS clusters. These are some of the most distant clusters of galaxies ever found, and are seen as they appeared when the Universe was only 4 billion years old. This new SpARCS sample has provided the best measurement to date of when and how fast galaxy clusters stop forming stars in the early Universe, finding that about 30 percent of galaxies which would normally be forming stars have been quenched in these distant clusters, 2016

    "Cosmic Neighbors Inhibit Star formation, Even in the Early Universe". UCR Press Release describing the discovery of four new SpARCS clusters, 2016

    "Astrophotography as a Gateway to Science". UCR Press Release describing how introducing astrophotography projects into my "History of the Universe" undergraduate breadth class resulted in students reporting better understanding of the material and also greatly reduced math anxiety, 2016

    "Astrophotography as a Gateway to Science". UCR Astronomy Press Release describing astrophotography projects, 2016

    "Did Neighborhood Harassment or Strangulation Stop Galaxies from Forming Stars?". UCR Astronomy Press Release describing results from a paper led by my graduate student Ryan Folz. We compared observations from the GCLASS survey of 10 galaxy-rich SpARCS clusters to a previously published sample of gas-rich X-ray selected clusters at the same distance/epoch. Remarkably, we learned that the galaxies in both samples had stopped forming stars at approximately the same time. This suggests that neither interactions with other galaxies nor interactions with hot gas are primarily responsible for turning off star formation off that, rather, another yet to be determined quenching mechanism which does not depend either on the cluster galaxies or the hot gas may is the culprit, 2015

    "Massive Galaxy Cluster Found to Be Bursting with New Stars". UCR press release about a huge amount of star formation found to be occurring in a distant galaxy cluster discovered by the SpARCS team, 2015

    "Prodigious "Brightest Cluster Galaxy" Discovered Churning Trillions of Stars". W. M. Keck Observatory press release about a huge amount of star formation found to be occurring in a distant galaxy cluster discovered by the SpARCS team, 2015

    "NASA Telescopes Find Galaxy Cluster with "Vibrant Heart" Discovered Churning Trillions of Stars". NASA press release about a huge amount of star formation found to be occurring in a distant galaxy cluster discovered by the SpARCS team, 2015

    "UCR Researchers Discover Galaxy Cluster". Article in UCR Highlander student newspaper about a huge amount of star formation found to be occurring in a distant galaxy cluster discovered by the SpARCS team, 2015

    Pedagogy

    Astronomy for the Deaf

    Designers of informal STEM education and public outreach activities often overlook people with hearing loss. Motivated to develop an activity specifically for the deaf community, Dr. Mario De Leo-Winkler and I teamed with teachers at the California School for the Deaf, Riverside (CSDR), to design "The Vibrating Universe" astronomy workshop for deaf students. The "Vibrating Universe" workshop used a sound stage so that CSDR students could "feel" vibrations from rockets, stars, galaxies, supernovae, and even the remnants of the Big Bang itself.

    The CSDR teachers, Dr. De Leo-Winkler and I published our experiences as "The Vibrating Universe: Astronomy for the Deaf" in the peer-reviewed Journal of Science Education and Technology
  • UCR Press Release
  • UCR Astronomy Press Release
  • There are dozens of similar sound stages in the U.S. alone. Our workshop could easily be adapted to include other astronomical phenomena or to focus on another scientific discipline. Educators interested in using our "Vibrating Universe" materials (slides, audio and video clips) and assessment methods can obtain them here.

    I am very proud to report that, Ms. Elizabeth Henderson, a Science Teacher at CSDR and core collaborator on "The Vibrating Universe", won the 2018 Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching, one of the highest honors bestowed by the U.S. government in the field of K-12 education.


    Astrophotography as a Science Gateway

    Because of the big, wide-ranging philosophical questions it asks and the beautiful images it generates, Astronomy creates a sense of wonder and awe in most people. For those reasons, Astronomy is considered by many to be a gateway into science. Over 200,000 non-science major students enroll in introductory astronomy elective classes every year in the U.S. alone, and for many college students, it is their only encounter with a natural science. Given its interdisciplinary links astronomy, therefore, is a particularly appropriate vehicle for teaching science to a wide audience.

    In collaboration with Dr. Mario De Leo-Winkler and Professor Gabriela Canalizo, I created hands-on astrophotography projects which I offered for extra credit as part of my "History of the Universe" undergraduate class. A high percentage of students majoring in social sciences, humanities, and arts take this course. They reported that the hands-on projects resulted in them having a better understanding of how astronomical instruments work, and of data reduction and image processing techniques. They also reported greatly reduced math anxiety. We believe that astrophotography is as an effective educational tool to engage non-science majors in science, and for producing future amateur astronomers and citizen scientists.

    We published our experiences as "Astrophotography, a Portal for Engaging Non-STEM Majors in Science", in the peer-reviewed "International Journal of STEM Education".
  • UCR Press Release
  • UCR Astronomy Press Release
  • UCR Classes Taught

  • PHYS 005, Lower Level Undergraduate, "History of the Universe"
  • PHYS 111, Upper Level Undergraduate, "Astrophysics and Stellar Astronomy"
  • PHYS 166, Upper Level Undergraduate, "Cosmology"
  • PHYS 218, Graduate, "Introduction to Astrophysics"
  • PHYS 215, Graduate, "Dynamics and Evolution of Galaxies"
  • Astronomy Resources for K12 Educators
  • "Cool Cosmos"- The Infrared Universe
  • NASA's "The Educator's Corner" - includes Lesson Plans, Posters and Information/Activity Booklets, DVD-ROMS, Data Suitable for Students to Analyze, Links to Education Resources
  • NASA Science For Educators - NASA searchable database of space science products for use in classrooms, science museums, planetariums, and other settings.
  • NSF Astronomy and Space Classroom Resources - a variety of Astronomy resources including Hands-on Labs.
  • NSF Physics Classroom Resources - a variety of Physics resources including Hands-on Labs.
  • "The Physics Classroom" - Online High School Physics Tutorials
  • American Astronomical Society (AAS) K-12 Resources - links to "especially effective astronomy activities designed for K-12 classes and science projects"
  • National Science Teachers Association - a comprehensive list of resources for science teachers
  • "Imagine The Universe" - NASA website intended for students age 14 and up
  • Public Outreach Activities

    Since 2015, my astronomy outreach activities have touched more than 50,000 people. These include 50 K-12 workshops and public telescope viewings, an astrophotography competition which resulted in a traveling picture exhibition, astronomy-themed interdisciplinary honors thesis projects (musical piece and play), an astronomy workshop for the deaf (published as "The Vibrating Universe: Astronomy for the Deaf", Journal of Science Education and Technology), and hands-on astrophotography projects which have been shown to act as a portal to science for non-STEM undergraduates and also greatly reduce math anxiety (published as "Astrophotography, a Portal for Engaging Non-STEM Majors in Science", International Journal of STEM Education). Many of these activities have been in collaboration with Dr. Mario De Leo-Winkler

  • "Vibrating Universe: Astronomy for the Deaf" workshop , designed to utilize the California School for the Deaf, Riverside (CSDR) vibrating sound stage. Multiple presentations made to ~200 deaf and hard-of-hearing students of different ages/abilities during three separate visits. Sign language explanations of cosmic phenomena followed by vibrations illustrating the phenomena (rockets, Jupiter, stars, galaxies, CMB).
  • UCR press release about "The Vibrating Universe: Making Astronomy Accessible to the Deaf"
  • "Music of the Spheres" original classical musical composition by undergraduate student Ryan Straka describing the future collision between the Milky Way, Andromeda, and Triangulum galaxies. Resulting from a cross-disciplinary thesis project with UCR's Department of Music. Multiple public performnances.
  • More about the "Music of the Spheres" interdisciplinary project between astronomy and music departments.
  • "Star Maps, Earth Codes" mixed media theatrical experience incorporating sky lore of the Orion constellation told across civilizations, animated by abstract puppets, lights, and sounds. Resulting from a cross-disciplinary thesis project with UCR's Department of Art. Ten public performances.
  • "Focus on the Universe: Astrophotographers of Southern California" picture competition
  • "Focus on the Universe" Exhibition of 17 astronomy pictures resulting from an astrophotography competition open to members of the public.
  • "Focus on the Universe" traveling picture exhibition.
  • Astrophotography reduces math anxiety amongst undergraduates and serves as gateway into science
  • UCR press release about Astrophotography being a portal to Science
  • Springer blog about Astrophotography project
  • K12 astronomy workshops (12 available).
  • Total Lunar Eclipse, 2018
  • Mars' Approach, 2018
  • Great American Eclipse, 2017
  • Transit of Mercury, 2016
  • Lunar Eclipse, 2015
  • "Astronomy & the Arts", culture and career talk to ~200 University Honors freshmen, UCR University Honors "Motivation of a University Scholar" Lecture Series, 2016 & 2018
  • "Jupiter and Globular Cluster Messier 3" Public Telescope Observation, 2015
  • "Solar Flares, Spots and Prominences" Public Telescope Observation, 2015
  • "The Expanding Universe, Dark Matter and Dark Energy: The Three Greatest Discoveries in Cosmology", "Cosmic Thursdays" Public Talk, UCR, 2016
  • "The Expanding Universe, Dark Matter and Dark Energy: The Three Greatest Discoveries in Cosmology", Public Talk, Palm Springs, 2015
  • Astronomy research and career talk to 8th grade girls interested in STEM fields, in collaboration with UCR University Honors Program, 2015
  • Regional Level Judge at RIMS (Riverside, Inyo, Mono and San Bernardino Counties) Science and Engineering Fair, 2010-2014
  • Keynote Speaker, "The Expanding Universe, Dark Matter and Dark Energy: The Three Greatest Discoveries in Cosmology", American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Pacific Division Meeting, UCR, 2014
  • Diversity, Equity and Inclusion

    I am passionately committed to diversity, equity and inclusion, and to attracting women and underrepresented minorities into STEM fields. I am also a sought-after thought leader and speaker in the area of women in science and technology. My astronomy outreach activities have reached more than 50,000 people.

    Improving the participation of underrepresented groups is important not just for addressing inequities and increasing the size of the scientifically-trained workforce. Many studies have demonstrated that it actually results in better science. This is because scientific progress relies on problem solving and collaboration, and groups composed of people with diverse experiences and areas of expertize tend to be more creative and innovative.

  • Keynote speaker, "Women in Science and Technology (WIST)" conference, UC San Diego
  • Keynote speaker, American Association for the Advancement of Science conference, UCR
  • Invited Speaker, "Why Diverse Teams Perform Better in Science, Innovation and Business", "Take Up Space in STEM" conference, UCR
  • Invited Speaker, "How to Think Like an Entrepreneur When It Comes to Your Own Scholarship", UCR Women's Faculty Association
  • Chair, Department of Physics & Astronomy's Graduate Diversity Committee, 2016-2017, Doubled the number of women entering the graduate program.
  • Faculty liaison to UCR's "Out in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics" (oSTEM) Chapter
  • Mentor, UCR Chapter of Association for Women in Science (AWIS)
  • Member and co-author, "Task Force on UCR Climate, Equity and Discrimination" report to UC Office of the President
  • Member, "Campus Climate and Community" committee, "The Path to Preeminence", UCR 2020 Strategic Plan
  • Invited Speaker, "Girls Excelling in Mathematics with Success (GEMS)" program, UCR
  • Innovation and Entrepreneurship

    I co-wrote and serve as co-PI (with Associate Vice Chancellor for Technology Partnerships, Dr. Rosibel Ochoa) on two grants which have brought NSF Innovation Corps Site status and more than $1M to fund new innovation and entrepreneurship programs for UCR faculty, postdocs and students. We also co-wrote and are co-leading "OASIS Innovations", an industry attraction proposal to accelerate the validation, demonstration and commercialization of new technologies to solve today's most pressing sustainability challenges in the fields of renewable energy, transportation, clean logistics, precision agriculture, air and water.

    NSF I-Corps

    In only the first three years of the program, 164 teams (506 participants) have been trained in Lean LaunchPad methodology, and several new UCR Startups have secured early-stage funding.
  • Press release about NSF I-Corps award.
  • Video about NSF I-Corps Startups for Innovators Program.

  • Blackstone LaunchPad

    Courses on entrepreneurism and innovation together with the launch of campus incubators and accelerators are becoming widely available across universities in the US and around the world. These programs not only open a window for students to explore alternative career paths through the launch and management of their own businesses but also help students develop important soft skills such as leadership, teamwork, problem solving, presentation and networking which will be instrumental in their success as professionals. Although these types of educational opportunities benefit all students, they have the potential for greatly impacting and improving the participation of women and underrepresented minorities in particular, in areas of high growth, technology entrepreneurship.
  • Press release about Blackstone LaunchPad.
  • Impact on Students.
  • Press release about first year of programs.

  • OASIS Innovations

  • "OASIS Innovations" is an industry partnership proposal to enable us to build the Engine to Accelerate Innovation and Startup Creation throughout the Region. OASIS Innovations is focused on validation, demonstration and commercialization of agricultural and environmentally sustainable techmologies using the region's "Living Laboratories". "Verticals" being targeted are renewable energy, transportation, clean logistics, precision agriculture, air and water.

  • Born in California

  • I am a graduate of the UC-CORO Systemwide Leadership Collaborative, a year-long program desigend to enhance leadership skills and foster relationships, networking and collaboration across UC. My cohort and I looked at systemwide University of California entrepreneurship opportunities, and together co-authored the report "Born in California".

  • Research Administration

    Multidisciplinary Research Building

  • I serve as Director of UCR's new $150M Multidisciplinary Research Building (MRB), the largest research facility on campus. I oversaw the move of 50 faculty and their research teams. MRB is designed for collaborative reasearch at the nexus of life/chemical sciences, engineering and medicine. It is the first campus building to attain a Leadership in Energy Design and Environmental Design (LEED) Platinum certification for energy efficiency.

  • Citrus Research Laboratory

  • I also oversaw the opening of UCR's new $8M Citrus Research Laboratory, aimed at curing Huanglongbing (citrus greening disease).

  • Research Core Facilities

  • I am leading an operational and fiscal review of UCR's research core facilities. I recently co-authored a peer-reviewed publication "Operational and Fiscal Management of Core Facilities", which resulted from a national survey I designed and carried out along with my Council on Research (CoR) Research Leader Fellow colleagues under the auspices of the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities (APLU).

  • Multidisciplinary Initiatives

  • I am also spearheading new multidisciplinary initiatives in "Aging" (50 faculty), "Water" (25 faculty) and "Precision Agriculture".

  • NSF CAREER Awards

  • I organize and lead annual NSF CAREER workshops and mock review panels. UCR currently has about 50 CAREER award holders, one of the highest number of awards on any campus in the UC system.

  • Contact

  • Email: gillianw@ucr.edu