Introduction to Social Network Methods

2. Why formal methods?


This page is part of an on-line text by Robert A. Hanneman (Department of Sociology, University of California, Riverside) and Mark Riddle (Department of Sociology, University of Northern Colorado).  Feel free to use and distribute this textbook, with citation. Your comments and suggestions are very welcome. Send me e-mail.
Contents of chapter 2:  Why formal methods?
Introduction:

The basic idea of a social network is very simple. A social network is a set of actors (or points, or nodes, or agents) that may have relationships (or edges, or ties) with one another. Networks can have few or many actors, and one or more kinds of relations between pairs of actors. To build a useful understanding of a social network, a complete and rigorous description of a pattern of social relationships is a necessary starting point for analysis. That is, ideally we will know about all of the relationships between each pair of actors in the population.

The amount of information that we need to describe even small social networks can be quite great.  Managing these data, and manipulating them so that we can see patterns of social structure can be tedious and complicated.  All of the tasks of social network methods are made easier by using tools from mathematics.  For the manipulation of network data, and the calculation of indexes describing networks, it is most useful to record information as matrices.  For visualizing patterns, graphs are often useful.


Efficiency

One reason for using mathematical and graphical techniques in social network analysis is to represent the descriptions of networks compactly and systematically. This also enables us to use computers to store and manipulate the information quickly and more accurately than we can by hand. For small populations of actors (e.g. the people in a neighborhood, or the business firms in an industry), we can describe the pattern of social relationships that connect the actors rather completely and effectively using words. To make sure that our description is complete, however, we might want to list all logically possible pairs of actors, and describe each kind of possible relationship for each pair. This can get pretty tedious if the number of actors and/or number of kinds of relations is large. Formal representations ensure that all the necessary information is systematically represented, and provides rules for doing so in ways that are much more efficient than lists.


Using computers

A related reason for using (particularly mathematical) formal methods for representing social networks is that mathematical representations allow us to apply computers to the analysis of network data. Why this is important will become clearer as we learn more about how structural analysis of social networks occurs. Suppose, for a simple example, we had information about trade-flows of 50 different commodities (e.g. coffee, sugar, tea, copper, bauxite) among the 170 or so nations of the world system in a given year. Here, the 170 nations can be thought of as actors or nodes, and the amount of each commodity exported from each nation to each of the other 169 can be thought of as the strength of a directed tie from the focal nation to the other. A social scientist might be interested in whether the "structures" of trade in mineral products are more similar to one another than, the structure of trade in mineral products are to vegetable products. To answer this fairly simple (but also pretty important) question, a huge amount of manipulation of the data is necessary. It could take, literally, years to do by hand; it can be done by a computer in a few minutes.


Seeing patterns

The third, and final reason for using "formal" methods (mathematics and graphs) for representing social network data is that the techniques of graphing and the rules of mathematics themselves suggest things that we might look for in our data things that might not have occurred to us if we presented our data using descriptions in words. Again, allow me a simple example.

Suppose we were describing the structure of close friendship in a group of four people: Bob, Carol, Ted, and Alice. This is easy enough to do with words. Suppose that Bob likes Carol and Ted, but not Alice; Carol likes Ted, but neither Bob nor Alice; Ted likes all three of the other members of the group; and Alice likes only Ted (this description should probably strike you as being a description of a very unusual social structure).

We could also describe this pattern of liking ties with an actor-by-actor matrix where the rows represent choices by each actor. We will put in a "1" if an actor likes another, and a "0" if they don't. Such a matrix would look like figure 2.1.

Figure 2.1.  Matrix representation of "liking" relation among four actors

  Bob Carol Ted Alice
Bob

---

1

1

0

Carol

0

---

1

0

Ted

1

1

---

1

Alice

0

0

1

---

There are lots of things that might immediately occur to us when we see our data arrayed in this way, that we might not have thought of from reading the description of the pattern of ties in words. For example, our eye is led to scan across each row; we notice that Ted likes more people than Bob, than Alice and Carol. Is it possible that there is a pattern here? Are men are more likely to report ties of liking than women are (actually, research literature suggests that this is not generally true). Using a "matrix representation" also immediately raises a question: the locations on the main diagonal (e.g. Bob likes Bob, Carol likes Carol) are empty. Is this a reasonable thing? Or, should our description of the pattern of liking in the group include some statements about "self-liking"? There isn't any right answer to this question. My point is just that using a matrix to represent the pattern of ties among actors may let us see some patterns more easily, and may cause us to ask some questions (and maybe even some useful ones) that a verbal description doesn't stimulate.


Summary

There are three main reasons for using "formal" methods in representing social network data:

So, we need to learn the basics of representing social network data using matrices and graphs. The next several chapters (3, 4, 5, and 6) introduce these basic tools.


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